Hiking in Extreme Heat Kills 14-Year-Old and Stepdad

Big Bend National Park reached 119úF.

On Saturday, the National Park Service (NPS) issued a press release confirming two visitor fatalities at Big Bend Nation Park in Texas.

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The park's communication center received a distress call at 6 p.m. on June 23, with a stepfather and his two stepsons requesting assistance on the Marufo Vega Trail.

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Big Bend National Park reached 119úF.

The surviving son returned to family

The incident is still under investigation, but VandenBerg told The Washington Post that the 21-year-old son was able to return to family in Florida.

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On June 21, Texas Monthly reported that a 17-year-old kid died after being rescued from Palo Duro Canyon State Park's Lighthouse Trail.

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The surviving son returned to family

A heat wave is currently affecting 55 million people

The CDC reports that there are approximately 618 heat-related fatalities every year, and while fatalities at Big Bend are still fairly rare, they do happen.

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But even if a hike at a national park isn't on your agenda this summer, you could still be affected by extreme temperatures.

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A heat wave is currently affecting 55 million people

The CDC says elderly persons, small children, outdoor laborers, and those with mental illness and chronic conditions are most at risk for heat-related illness. 

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Know who's at risk and pay attention to warning signs

When the body cannot sweat, heat stroke and heat exhaustion result. Brain and organ damage might result from rapid body temperature rise.

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Know who's at risk and pay attention to warning signs

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